What’s new with SCN8A – a 2016 update

An unexpected twist in the SCN8A story. SCN8A mutations were first implicated in epilepsy in 2012, when a de novo missense variant was identified in a patient with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE) via genome sequencing. Since then, a number of patients with de novo heterozygous SCN8A variants and epilepsy have been reported, firmly establishing the role of SCN8A in EIEE, and we have learned a lot about the associated phenotype, mutation spectrum and disease mechanism within the last four years. Recently, a heterozygous familial SCN8A missense variant was identified in several families with a significantly milder epilepsy phenotype than reported in previous patients. Read further to learn more about the expanded SCN8A-associated epilepsy phenotype. Continue reading

SCN8A – this is what you need to know in 2015

SCN8A. In 2015, SCN8A has emerged as an important gene in epileptic encephalopathy. SCN8A encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.6, and was first implicated in epileptic encephalopathy in 2012. Since then, approximately 100 cases of early-infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations of SCN8A have been identified, and the disorder has been designated EIEE13. Here is what you need to know about SCN8A in 2015.

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Publications of the week: SCN8A, SYN1, ZDHHC9, and SCNM1

Power outage. This week’s publications of the week were conceptualized in complete darkness. A thunderstorm had hit the Philadelphia area on Tuesday, leading to widespread power outages in the region. I found myself in the strange position of being without power for a night, but with full strength cell phone reception and a completely charged laptop battery. Here is our post on the most relevant publications of the last few weeks, written in the calm of a dark night where the only sound around was the howling of our neighbor’s backup generator. Continue reading

SCN1A and Dravet Syndrome – your questions for the Channelopathist

Comments. After posting our 2015 update on what you should know about SCN1A, we received a number of comments on our blog and by email. We usually have the policy to respond to every comment individually. However, after we had realized that we had fallen behind with a few replies for several weeks, we felt that it might be worthwhile rephrasing some of the questions as general topics to write about, especially since many of your questions raised interesting points. Here are the questions that you asked regarding SCN1A and Dravet Syndrome. Continue reading

SCN1A – this is what you should know in 2015

2015 update. Our updates on SCN1A mutations and Dravet Syndrome are amongst our most frequently read posts. Therefore, following the tradition of annual reviews that we started last year, we thought that a quick update on SCN1A would be timely again, building on our previous 2014 update. These are the five things about SCN1A that you should know in 2015. Continue reading

Identifying the Doose gene – SLC6A1 mutations in Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy

Doose Syndrome. In the early 1970s, a group of children with severe childhood epilepsies was found to have comparable clinical features that consisted of quick jerks and subsequent drop attacks amongst other types of epileptic seizures. These seizures, myoclonic-astatic or myoclonic-atonic seizures, eventually became the defining feature of an epilepsy syndrome referred to as Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy or Doose Syndrome. In the recent issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics, we report on the first true gene for Doose Syndrome. Here is the story of SLC6A1 (GAT-1). Continue reading

Publications of the week – Dravet Syndrome, TBC1D24, and CSTB

Issue 6/2015. Publications from the most recent issue of Epilepsia are very prominent in this week’s selection of publications. We discuss the frequency of Dravet Syndrome, a novel family with a TBC1D24 mutation, and the role of Cystatin B (CSTB) in Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy. Continue reading

The two faces of KCNA2 – a novel epileptic encephalopathy

Delayed rectifier. The discovery of de novo mutations in ion channel genes as a cause for genetic epilepsies continues. In a recent publication in Nature Genetics, we have identified de novo mutations in KCNA2 as a novel cause of epileptic encephalopathies associated with ataxia. Interestingly, even within a single gene, two different phenotypes seem to be emerging. Continue reading

A genetic counselor’s wish list for epilepsy genetics in 2015

Mt. Rainier. After our recent posts about the 2014 AES in Seattle, we received an email from Beth in Boston, highlighting some of the issues that genetic counselor face in epilepsy genetics when dealing with next gen sequencing data. Beth drew up a wish list for 2015 and asked us for comments. Here is a brief discussion between Beth and me on how high throughput epilepsy genetics sometimes comes to grinding halt in clinical practice. Continue reading