Changing the debate on epilepsy genetics – the ILAE Epilepsiome Task Force

Epilepsiome. Within the new structure of the ILAE Genetics Commission, the Epilepsiome has become a Task Force for the current term. Our blog has accompanied the developments in the field of neurogenetics for the last seven years and has seen the rise of next-generation sequencing and formal gene and variant curation frameworks. This has left us with a basic question: what is left to say? Should the future Epilepsiome simply chronicle what is happening in the field or should we try to use our platform to develop novel and potentially provocative thoughts? Within the current Epilepsiome Task Force, we decided to try the latter. There has been much attention paid to, and understandably much excitement about, the prospect of targeted precision treatments based on specific gene mutations. But could this be a Potemkin village based on unrealistic treatment expectations? What else is happening in the field of epilepsy genetics, outside the spotlight? We agreed that the new Epilepsiome Task Force will strive to emphasize a richer, globally oriented, and multifaceted view of the genetic basis of human epilepsies and neurodevelopmental disorders. Here are the three things that our Task Force hopes to accomplish. Continue reading

Three things the beach told me about science in 2018

Baggersee. With an unprecedented heat wave hitting the northern hemisphere, I eventually found my annual vacation blog post. I wrote blog posts about our beach vacation in Marielyst, Denmark, or Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. However, this year, it took me the better part of two weeks to realize that I had this year’s beach right beneath my feet – the small artificial beach of the Rossenray Lake, a small lake in my home town in Germany where we spent our summer vacation. And here are the three things the beach (and the lake) told me about science in 2018. Continue reading

The genetic architecture of the epilepsies, as told by 8,500 gene panels

Epilepsy gene panel. Testing for genetic causes in human epilepsy is typically performed using gene panels. In contrast to our research-based exome studies in an academic setting, much of the gene panel testing is performed through commercial laboratories and much of the existing data is usually inaccessible to the scientific community. In a recent publication in Epilepsia, a large US-based diagnostic laboratory reports on some of their existing data on epilepsy gene panels by reporting the results of more than 8500 epilepsy gene panels – a cohort size that is more than five times larger than any prior exome or gene panel study in the epilepsy field. I was asked to write an editorial on this publication, and I also wanted summarize on our blog three key messages that you can take away from this study. Continue reading

Paradigm shifts in epilepsy genetics – continuing the ILAE genetic literacy series

Genetic literacy. Sometimes important milestones don’t feel like much when you eventually reach them. Last Thursday, I woke up sleep-deprived after working on a grant all night and found an NCBI update in my mailbox. Primer Part 2 of the genetic literacy series of ILAE Genetics Commission was now published in Epilepsia and available on PubMed. Finally, both the introductory primers of the genetic literacy series are out – Part 1 dealing with the building blocks including general concepts of epilepsy genetics and epidemiology and now Part 2 about the paradigm shifts that were introduced with the advent of massive parallel sequencing. Both publications were revised and re-written over and over again to fit the overall didactic mission of the literacy series, an effort that takes approximately 10x as long as writing a typical review. But finally, as of May 10, 2018, both Primers are now in their final shape, published and open access to the international epilepsy community. And here is just a quick overview of what this paradigm shift is really about. Continue reading

The mitochondrial box cutter – an unexpected role for PMPCB in neurodegeneration

MPP. Mitochondria are indispensable for cellular energy production and require constant protein import, as most mitochondrial genes are encoded in the nucleus. In order for proper targeting, mitochondrial proteins have a specific presequence, which is removed once a protein has found its way into the mitochondria. This function is accomplished by the mitochondrial processing peptidase MPP, which is encoded by the PMPCA and PMPCB genes. In a recent publication in the American Journal of Human Genetics, we identified PMPCB as a novel gene for a complex neurodegenerative condition in childhood and discovered a new disease mechanism for neurological disorders. However, epileptic encephalopathy that initially led to the inclusion of our initial RES study was only one extreme of an unusual disease spectrum.  Continue reading

Finding the missing sodium channel – SCN3A in epileptic encephalopathy

Sodium channel. Voltage-gated channels for sodium ions are a crucial component of helping neurons depolarize and repolarize in a way that enables generation of action potentials. However, in order to function properly, voltage-gated ion channels co-exist in a fragile balance, and genetic alterations leading to functional changes in these channels are known causes of disease. SCN1A, SCN2A, and SCN8A have been implicated as causes for human epilepsy. However, SCN3A encoding the Nav1.3 channel, one of the most obvious candidates, could not be linked to disease so far. In a recent publication, we were able identify disease-causing mutations in this major neuronal ion channel. Interestingly, patients with an early onset and the most severe presentation had a prominent gain-of-function effect that responded to known antiepileptic medications. Continue reading

SLC6A1 – a generalized epilepsy phenotype emerging

GAT1. When we first identified SLC6A1 in 2015, we were surprised that a significant proportion of patients with disease-causing variants in this gene had a rare epilepsy phenotype referred to as Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy (MAE). Typically, at the time of gene discovery, it is often unclear how far the phenotypic spectrum expands. In a recent publication in Epilepsia, we reviewed the phenotype of 34 patients with SCL6A1-related epilepsy. Surprisingly, in contrast to many other epilepsy genes that showed a broad and occasionally non-specific phenotypic range, the SLC6A1-related phenotype expands beyond MAE, but remains centered around generalized epilepsies with a predominance of absence seizures and atonic seizures. It is a gene that has started to write its own story. Continue reading

Epilepsy genetics in 2018 – Three things that will happen and three things that won’t

Bomb Cyclone. While the entire US East Cost was held hostage by a weather system that introduced us to new catchy meterological concepts such as bombogenesis, I hope that everybody is staying warm and safe. I wanted to wish all our readers a Happy 2018 and try to give an outlook of the New Year in epilepsy genetics.  Here are three things in epilepsy genetics that will happen in 2018 – and three things that won’t. Continue reading

AES 2017 – Making Sense of Genetic Data in Epilepsy

Controversies. While you are packing your bags for the 71st Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society in Washington, D.C., we wanted to point out one agenda item that may be of interest for you. The AES agenda typically has many parallel sessions, so I wanted to make a plug for our Genetics Special Interest Group (SIG) on Friday, 12/1 at 1:30PM. The topic of our SIG is going to be “Making Sense of Genetic Data in Epilepsy – Consensus and Controversy in 2017”. In contrast to regular sessions and lectures, a SIG is meant to stimulate discussion between SIG members. Therefore, in parallel to previous years, we would like to invite the attendees to use the opportunity to discuss challenging cases within a dedicated AES Special Interest Group. Continue reading

Guardians of the epilepsy genes

Epilepsiome, meet ClinGen. For more than a year, I have meant to write about the extension of the Epilepsiome effort to our ClinGen epilepsy working group. The overall ClinGen framework is a NIH-funded resource dedicated to building a central resource that defines the clinical relevance of genes and variants for use in precision medicine and research. Within this framework, the ClinGen Epilepsy Working group is a group of curators to apply the formal framework to epilepsy genes. Given the explosion of genetic data, curating epilepsy genes is important as a basis for precision medicine and long overdue. Within our epilepsy working group, we build upon the ClinGen framework to make it applicable to epilepsy genes. Here is what you need to know about epilepsy gene curation.

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