Returning genetic results to research participants: challenges and opportunities

A successful partnership. Making progress in understanding the genetics of the epilepsies requires a successful partnership involving many players. Researchers, clinicians, patients, and families must work together in order to advance scientific goals. Since the first genetic etiology was discovered in a large family with Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy nearly 20 years ago, we have made many strides scientifically, in terms of technologies, our clinical classifications, and our knowledge of genetics. Our views on how we approach research from an ethical perspective is also continuing to evolve. Genetic research hinges on the participation of patients and families, and returning results to participants is increasingly viewed as imperative. A recent paper has used the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) and Epi4K studies as a case example of the challenges and opportunities regarding returning genetic results to research participants. Continue reading

Exploring the dark matter of the human genome – de novo mutations in regulatory elements

Unsolved cases. We are in an era of dramatic progress in understanding the genetic causes of neurologic disorders. In spite of this progress, many cases remain unsolved even after whole exome sequencing. One hypothesis for this missing heritability is that “non-coding” mutations outside the exome may explain at least some of these unsolved cases. A recent study looked at de novonon-coding variants in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. The study sheds new light on this question and reminds us that, despite all the recent progress, there is much still to learn about vast portions of the genome. Continue reading