What’s new with SCN8A – a 2016 update

An unexpected twist in the SCN8A story. SCN8A mutations were first implicated in epilepsy in 2012, when a de novo missense variant was identified in a patient with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE) via genome sequencing. Since then, a number of patients with de novo heterozygous SCN8A variants and epilepsy have been reported, firmly establishing the role of SCN8A in EIEE, and we have learned a lot about the associated phenotype, mutation spectrum and disease mechanism within the last four years. Recently, a heterozygous familial SCN8A missense variant was identified in several families with a significantly milder epilepsy phenotype than reported in previous patients. Read further to learn more about the expanded SCN8A-associated epilepsy phenotype. Continue reading

SCN8A – this is what you need to know in 2015

SCN8A. In 2015, SCN8A has emerged as an important gene in epileptic encephalopathy. SCN8A encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.6, and was first implicated in epileptic encephalopathy in 2012. Since then, approximately 100 cases of early-infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations of SCN8A have been identified, and the disorder has been designated EIEE13. Here is what you need to know about SCN8A in 2015.

Continue reading