Heat at the synapse revisited: an STX1B update

Heat at the synapse revisited. STX1B encodes syntaxin 1B, one of three proteins – along with SNAP25 and synaptobrevin – that form the SNARE complex. The SNARE complex is part of the protein machinery responsible for Ca2+-dependent fusion of the presynaptic neuronal cell membrane with the synaptic vesicle to enable neurotransmitter exocytosis. STXBP1 also plays an important role in this process, as the syntaxin binding protein encoded by STXBP1 interacts with the SNARE complex via binding to syntaxin. While pathogenic variants in STXBP1 are a well-established cause of early-onset epilepsies and related neurodevelopmental disorders, after the initial description of STX1B-related epilepsies in 2014, very little more was heard regarding STX1B in the intervening four years. Now, we contributed patients to a publication in Neurology, which provides an update regarding the clinical and genetic landscape of STX1B-related epilepsies. Continue reading

HCN1 enters the GEFS+ sphere

HCN1 update. Hyperpolarization-activated cation channels (HCN) are involved in neuronal pacemaker activity and regulate neuronal excitability through hyperpolarization-activated Icurrent. In 2014 de novo missense variants in HCN1 were identified in five unrelated individuals with a Dravet Syndrome-like developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). However, in the intervening four years relatively little additional evidence has emerged regarding the role of HCN1 in epilepsy. Now, a recent publication in Brain identifies additional individuals with HCN1-related epilepsies and significantly expands the clinical spectrum beyond Dravet-like DEE. Continue reading

Cause or coincidence – recessive SCN1A variants in Dravet Syndrome

Recessive epilepsies. Dravet Syndrome is one of the most prominent genetic epilepsies and presents in the first year of life with prolonged fever-associated seizures. Haploinsufficiency of SCN1A, either through mutations or deletions, is the major cause of Dravet Syndrome. In a recent publication in the European Journal of Pediatric Neurology, two families with recessive Dravet Syndrome and biallelic SCN1A variants are reported. Let’s have a look at how to interpret these findings. Continue reading

Beyond SCN1A – Copy Number Variations in fever-associated epilepsies

Fever and epilepsy. When it comes to epilepsy and fever, either Febrile Seizures or Dravet Syndrome are usually the most prominent topics on our blog. However, in addition to these syndromes, there various other epilepsies that have fever-related seizures as a prominent feature. In a recent publication in Epilepsia, we investigated the role of microdeletions in a group of patients with prominent fever-associated epilepsies. Our findings suggest that fever-associated epilepsy syndromes may be a presentation of known microdeletion syndromes. Continue reading

Publications of the week – SRP9, Nebulin, and Kuf’s disease

Issue 2/2015. For the second issue of our publications of the week in 2015, we have selected recent publications on the genetics of Febrile Seizures, the complexities of interpreting variants in large genes and functional studies on progressive myoclonus epilepsies due to mutations in SCARB2 and CTSF. Continue reading

Heat at the synapse – STX1B mutations in fever-associated epilepsies

Febrile Seizures. The discovery of the genes for fever-associated epilepsies was one of the most relevant milestones in epilepsy genetics. Discovery of the underlying genes including SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2 was tightly linked to the development of the Genetic/Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus (GEFS+) concept, describing the spectrum of epilepsy phenotypes seen in families with these mutations. Gene discovery in GEFS+, however, has slowed down in recent years, and no further causative genes had been identified for more than a decade. Now, in a recent paper in Nature Genetics, mutations in STX1B are found as a novel cause for fever-associated epilepsies. Continue reading

Have we given up on the genetics of febrile seizures?

Fever, genes, and seizures. Undoubtedly, febrile seizures are the most common epilepsy syndrome in humans. Up to 5% of children have febrile seizures. In most children, these febrile seizures are self-limiting, and there is no recurrence. Usually, no long-term treatment is required. We know from family studies and twin studies that febrile seizures have a significant genetic component. Now here are two surprising facts: first, the genetic contribution to febrile seizures is entirely unknown. Secondly, to my knowledge, the genetic contribution to the most common epilepsy syndrome in man has not been addressed in any of the current large-scale studies. Let’s review why this is the case and why we should change this. Continue reading

Switching inhibition on – SLC12A5/KCC2 variants in human epilepsy

Inhibition. We usually like to think of GABA as an inhibitory neurotransmitter, which counteracts the excitatory and potentially epileptogenic effects of glutamate. However, this is not always true during brain development. Initially, GABA is a powerful excitatory neurotransmitter. The excitatory effect of GABA has been shown to be important for brain development and the formation of dendritic spines – and the switch from excitation to inhibition is due to a single ion channel: KCC2, encoded by SLC12A5. Two recent publications in EMBO Reports now implicate genetic variation in SLC12A5 in human epilepsy. Continue reading

Modifier genes in Dravet Syndrome: where to look and how to find them

Converging thoughts. During late 2013, I had several unrelated discussions about the possible role of genetic modifiers of SCN1A in Dravet Syndrome. To some extent, SCN1A is a paradox. One the one hand, the connection between Dravet Syndrome and SCN1A is one of the clearest connections between gene and disease that we see in genetic epilepsies. On the other hand, we see a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity in families, and some presumably pathogenic SCN1A variants can also be identified in unaffected control individuals. This leaves us with the question whether there are genetic modifiers in Dravet Syndrome that might help provide some insight into additional mechanisms of disease. This post is a collection of 10 individual thoughts that emerged during the discussions last year. Continue reading