The story of the missed SCN1A mutations

Dravet Syndrome. In 2011, our EuroEPINOMICS-RES program was in full swing. We had recruited a cohort of 31 patients with Dravet Syndrome who had been previously tested negative for mutations in SCN1A with the aim to identify novel genes for this epileptic encephalopathy. Even though this cohort was crucial in our identification of CHD2, HCN1, and KCNA2 as novel genes for genetic epilepsies, the main finding in this cohort was something that we did not expect. Roughly one third of our 31 patients had mutations in SCN1A, even though they had previously been tested negative. In a recent publication in Molecular Genetics and Genomic Medicine, we tried to understand what had happened and joined forces with other groups who had made the same observation. Here is the story of the missed SCN1A mutations. Continue reading

Mysteries of a neuronal pathfinder – this is what you should know about PCDH19 in 2015

Protocadherin. There are some genes that we have mentioned less frequently on our blog than we should have. PCDH19 and CDKL5 are two examples of this. With this post, we try to catch up by reviewing some of the new findings related to PCDH19 Female Epilepsy including the role of neurosteroids, anti-NMDA receptor antibodies, stiripentol and the mechanism behind this epilepsy. Continue reading

Publications of the week – Dravet Syndrome, TBC1D24, and CSTB

Issue 6/2015. Publications from the most recent issue of Epilepsia are very prominent in this week’s selection of publications. We discuss the frequency of Dravet Syndrome, a novel family with a TBC1D24 mutation, and the role of Cystatin B (CSTB) in Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy. Continue reading

Flickering lights, endophenotypes, and EEG genetics – CHD2 in photosensitivity

Heritable. Many epilepsy syndromes have signature EEG traits, and these traits are thought to have a strong genetic component. The endophenotype concept suggests that using these epilepsy-related traits in genetic studies will facilitate gene discovery, a concept that has failed us so far in epilepsy research, unfortunately. Now, in a recent publication in Brain, we were able to demonstrate that variants in CHD2 predispose to photosensitivity, an abnormal cortical response to flickering light. Finally, after several decades of persisting difficulties, there is some progress in the field of EEG genetics. Continue reading

The two faces of KCNA2 – a novel epileptic encephalopathy

Delayed rectifier. The discovery of de novo mutations in ion channel genes as a cause for genetic epilepsies continues. In a recent publication in Nature Genetics, we have identified de novo mutations in KCNA2 as a novel cause of epileptic encephalopathies associated with ataxia. Interestingly, even within a single gene, two different phenotypes seem to be emerging. Continue reading

Beyond SCN1A – Copy Number Variations in fever-associated epilepsies

Fever and epilepsy. When it comes to epilepsy and fever, either Febrile Seizures or Dravet Syndrome are usually the most prominent topics on our blog. However, in addition to these syndromes, there various other epilepsies that have fever-related seizures as a prominent feature. In a recent publication in Epilepsia, we investigated the role of microdeletions in a group of patients with prominent fever-associated epilepsies. Our findings suggest that fever-associated epilepsy syndromes may be a presentation of known microdeletion syndromes. Continue reading

CHD2 myoclonic encephalopathy – delineating a novel disease

CHD2. In 2013, mutations in CHD2 were reported in various publications including two major studies on epileptic encephalopathies, reinforcing the notion that de novo mutations in this gene are a recurrent cause of epileptic encephalopathies. However, large-scale studies often cannot fully appreciate the complete phenotype of the patient behind the gene finding. Therefore, it is difficult to appreciate similarities between patients and assess whether phenotypes constitute a recognizable entity. In a recent publication in Neurology, the phenotype of CHD2 encephalopathy is explored in detail – it represents a distinct, recognizable disease entity. Continue reading

AP4S1 in fever-associated epilepsies and spastic paraplegia

Peds vs. adult. Sometimes it makes a fundamental difference in diagnosis whether a patient is seen in a pediatric setting or by an adult specialist later in life. Here is the most recent example from our consortium, which was just published in Human Molecular Genetics: what initially looked like recessive inheritance with intellectual disability and a peculiar fever-associated epilepsy syndrome eventually turned out to be the second reported family of the novel spastic paraplegia gene AP4S1. This raises the question of how much we are missing if we are looking at the wrong point in time. Let’s have a look at how genetics can help us see an overlap of diseases where we usually don’t have a chance to. Continue reading

These are the top 10 epilepsy genes of 2014

Top 10. 2014 has been a very productive year in epilepsy gene discovery and with our final blog post this year, we wanted to provide a brief overview of what has been pertinent this year. From the multitude of novel genes identified this year, here are the 10 most relevant findings – including some genes that you probably didn’t expect. Continue reading

Beyond recessive – KCNC1 mutations in progressive myoclonus epilepsy

PME. The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PME) are a particular subtype of seizure disorders characterized by progressive myoclonus, generalized seizures and cognitive deterioration. Known causes of PME include recessive mutations in several well-known genes, but the genetic cause is unknown in a significant proportion of patients. Now, in a recent paper in Nature Genetics, de novo mutations in KCNC1 are identified as a novel cause of progressive myoclonus epilepsies. In addition to elucidating the genetic basis in a significant subset of patients with PME, the authors demonstrate that de novo mutations play an important role in a group of diseases usually thought to be recessive. Continue reading