The 2018 neurological phenotyping course for systems genetics – an invitation to Luxembourg

Computational phenotypes. Clinical epilepsy research requires the capturing of complex information in a way that then can be subjected to statistical analysis. For the analysis on the phenotype level, new standards are emerging that are heavily informed by genetic studies. In fact, in addition to the known domain-specific classifications such as the ILAE classification for epilepsy, interdisciplinary action is often required to improve the classification of neurological syndromes for a larger analysis. During the upcoming EMBO Practical phenotyping course in Luxembourg, we will introduce trainees in the field to concepts like the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO), a controlled vocabulary to characterize syndromes and one of pillars of research in complex syndromes such as epilepsy and how to address aspects not covered in HPO. The course will be held in Luxembourg from Oct 4 to Oct 10, 2018. There has already been a strong interest in this course, but we have a few spots left if you would like to register!

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Five elements to include in your manuscript to get full ClinGen points

ClinGen Epilepsy Gene Curation Expert Panel. For the past year I have been a member of the ClinGen Epilepsy Gene Curation Expert Panel, which has been a rewarding professional experience. I have gotten to know several colleagues within the epilepsy and ClinGen communities, I’ve become familiar with resources for gene curation including MONDO and HPO, and I’ve dived deeply into the existing literature linking genes with a broad spectrum of epilepsies. But working with ClinGen has had another unexpected benefit – it has influenced my approach to writing scientific manuscripts. I have been able to apply this knowledge recently when writing a manuscript about a new causative gene for developmental and epileptic encephalopathies. In this post I would like to share five insider tips about what to include in your genetics manuscript so that it can receive full consideration from the ClinGen Epilepsy Expert Panel.
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The power of 3 – exome trios in neurodevelopmental disorders with epilepsy

Trio exomes. The concept of neurodevelopmental disorders is an umbrella term including intellectual disability, developmental delay, and autism spectrum disorder. About one quarter of these patients have epilepsy, including epileptic encephalopathy, in which the epileptic activity itself contributes to developmental delay or regression. One major cause of these disorders are de novomutations, which are present in the child but not present in either of the parents. A recent publication in Nature Genetics looked for de novo variants in nearly 6,700 patients with neurodevelopmental disorders, nearly 2,000 of whom had epilepsy. This study is an order of magnitude larger than the largest previous study of this kind and represents an important effort in epilepsy genetics. Here is what we want to review their major findings. Continue reading