Have we given up on the genetics of febrile seizures?

Fever, genes, and seizures. Undoubtedly, febrile seizures are the most common epilepsy syndrome in humans. Up to 5% of children have febrile seizures. In most children, these febrile seizures are self-limiting, and there is no recurrence. Usually, no long-term treatment is required. We know from family studies and twin studies that febrile seizures have a significant genetic component. Now here are two surprising facts: first, the genetic contribution to febrile seizures is entirely unknown. Secondly, to my knowledge, the genetic contribution to the most common epilepsy syndrome in man has not been addressed in any of the current large-scale studies. Let’s review why this is the case and why we should change this. Continue reading

GABRA1 and STXBP1 as novel genes for Dravet Syndrome

Beyond SCN1A. Dravet Syndrome is a severe fever-associated epileptic encephalopathy. While the large majority of patients with Dravet Syndrome carry mutations in the SCN1A gene, the genetic basis is unknown in up to 20% of patients. Some female patients with Dravet-like epilepsies have mutations in PCDH19, but other than this, no additional major gene for typical Dravet Syndrome is known. In a recent paper in Neurology, de novo mutations in GABRA1 and STXBP1 are identified as novel causes for Dravet Syndrome. In addition, several SCN1A-negative patients were shown to have mutations in SCN1A that were initially missed. Continue reading