How to find recessive disease genes for epileptic encephalopathies

The E2 story continues. There has been major progress in identifying the role of de novo mutations in infantile spasms and other epileptic encephalopathies. Over the last two years, more than 20 new genes for epileptic encephalopathies were discovered and we have good evidence suggesting that de novo mutations play a major role in these disorders. Moreover, we have gotten a good sense on how complicated it can be to call a de novo mutation pathogenic given the flood of rare genetic variants in the human genome. However, de novo mutations are not what we think about clinically when assessing a patient with new-onset epileptic encephalopathy. In a clinical setting, we are often concerned about underlying metabolic disorders, many of which are recessive. Accordingly, we felt that the next task of the E2 consortium was to assess the role of inherited variants in epileptic encephalopathies. Just to tell you in advance, it is not as easy as it sounds.

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WWOX, spinocerebellar ataxia, neurodegeneration, and epilepsy

Exomes. Massive parallel sequencing technologies are ideally suited to identify the genetic basis of monogenic disorders, particularly recessive diseases. In a recent publication in the Orphanet Journal of Rare Disease, Abdel-Salam and collaborators identify a homozygous mutation in WWOX in a family with epileptic encephalopathy and neurodegeneration. Their study highlights the issues of how to interpret recessive gene findings spanning different phenotypes identified in the era of exome sequencing. Continue reading

Publications of the week: SLC13A5, SNAP25, and JME fMRI endophenotypes

Catching up. It has been a while since we posted a section on the recent publications in the field of epilepsy genetics. We are trying to catch up by briefly discussing three publications that appeared in the last two weeks. Here is what you should know about citrate transporters in epileptic encephalopathy, an STXBP1-interacting protein, and fMRI endophenotypes in Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (JME). Continue reading

Treatable causes of intellectual disability and epilepsy that you don’t want to miss

Think metabolic. We have discussed de novo mutations as a cause of epileptic encephalopathies repeatedly on our blog. While there is emerging evidence that de novo mutations in established genes such as SCN1A or CDKL5 or novel genes including GNAO1 or CHD2 are a major cause of genetic morbidity in patients with epileptic encephalopathies, investigations for de novo mutations are not the immediate knee-jerk reaction in clinical practice. In fact, if a child presents with an epileptic encephalopathy, excluding inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) takes priority. While metabolic causes of epileptic encephalopathies are rare, they need to be excluded as some of these conditions are treatable. In a recent review in Molecular Genetics and Metabolism, van Karnebeek and colleagues review the 89 causes of intellectual disability that are potentially treatable. Many of these conditions also present with epilepsy. They present an updated diagnostic algorithm and provide an online resource for these conditions – in a nutshell, there is an app for that.  Continue reading

Recessive mutations in autism – the return of hidden metabolic disorders

My wrong guesses of 2012. Two weeks ago during a presentation, I had to admit that there is little evidence for a large contribution of recessive or compound heterozygous mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. At the beginning of 2012, I had initially suggested that recessive or compound heterozygous mutation of known neurometabolic disorders could be identified through exome sequencing in sporadic epileptic encephalopathies. However, as of 2013, there is little evidence for this in our data or the data from other consortia. Now, two papers in Cell suggest a significant contribution of recessive mutations in autism including a revival of the “hidden neurometabolic hypothesis”. Continue reading