SCN2A – a neurodevelopmental disorder digitized through 10,860 phenotypic annotations

HPO. SCN2A-related disorders represent one of the most common causes of neurodevelopmental disorders and developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEE). However, while a genetic diagnosis is easily made through high-throughput genetic testing, SCN2A-related disorders have such a broad phenotypic range that understanding the full scale of the clinical features has been traditionally difficult. In our recent study, we used a harmonized framework for phenotypes based on the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) to systematically curate phenotypic annotations in all individuals reported in the literature and followed at our center, a total of 413 unrelated individuals. Mapping phenotypic data onto 10,860 terms with 562 unique concepts and applying some of the computational tools we have developed over the last three years, we were able to delineate the phenotypic range in unprecedented detail. SCN2A is now the first DEE with all available data systematically curated and harmonized in a computable format, allowing for entirely novel insights. Continue reading

OMIM to retire EIEE classification – an important step to overhaul terminology for genetic epilepsies

EIEE. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is the undisputed main resource for information regarding genes and disease. It is the resource that the majority of clinicians and researchers in the field turn to in order to get information about established or novel genetic etiologies in genetic epilepsies and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, historically, OMIM had decided to enumerate many of the genes for developmental and epileptic encephalopathies within a phenotypic series called Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathies (EIEE). The field has advanced, and we now understand that most genetic etiologies have a broad phenotypic range and can cause a wide range of epilepsy phenotypes. Accordingly, in collaboration and consultation with our ClinGen epilepsy clinical domain working group, OMIM will retire the EIEE classification and refer to them as developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEE). Dravet Syndrome, formerly EIEE6 will now become DEE6, which is the secondary annotation to the actual term “Dravet Syndrome”. For some, this might be a small change in semantics. However, as a clinician trying to make sure that the uniqueness and distinctiveness of childhood epilepsies in the era of large-scale data analysis is appreciated, this small step is likely to be highly influential in the future. Here is some background on how the EIEEs finally became DEEs. Continue reading