This was AES 2021 – five takeaways from Chicago

Pandemic. This year’s Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society (AES) was the 75th meeting, but it was a meeting like no other. #AES2021 was the first in-person meeting for the international epilepsy community with many international participants unable to join due to local restrictions and the US-based audience split between participating in-person and joining remotely. However, despite the unusual format, this year’s meeting was bustling and full of excellent science. Here are my five takeaways from AES 2021. Continue reading

The natural history of genetic epilepsies as told by 3,200 years of electronic medical records

EMR. When we consider the natural history of rare diseases like the genetic epilepsies, we typically think about a lack of longitudinal data that contrasts with the abundant genetic information that is available nowadays – the so-called phenotyping gap. We typically suggest that we need to obtain this information in future prospective studies to better understand long-term outcome, response to medications, and potential early warning signs for an adverse disease course. However, a vast amount of clinical data is collected on an ongoing basis through electronic medical records (EMR) as a byproduct of regular patient care. In a recent study, our group built tools to mine the electronic medical records to assess the disease history of 658 individuals with known or presumed epilepsies using clinical information collected at more than 62,000 patients encounters across more than 3,200 patient years. Here is a brief summary of our first study on EMR genomics, an untapped resource that has the potential to improve our understanding of the genetic epilepsies. Continue reading